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Reproductive Health & Pregnancy Therapeutics

Preterm Labor (24-34 weeks)

Preterm labor, defined as the birthing process starting prior to 37 weeks of gestation, is a serious condition characterized by uterine contractions, cervical dilation and rupture of the fetal membranes that can lead to preterm birth. According to a study published in the Lancet in 2012, approximately 15 million babies were born before 37 weeks of gestation in 2010, accounting for 11.1% of all live births worldwide. Over 1 million children under the age of five died in 2013 worldwide due to preterm birth complications, and many infants who survive preterm birth are at greater risk for cerebral palsy, delays in development, hearing and vision issues, and often face a lifetime of disability. The rates of preterm births are rising in almost all countries with reliable data for preterm birth, and are associated with an immense financial impact to the global healthcare system.

To date, only treatments with limited efficacy or restrictive safety issues are available to treat preterm labor. In the United States, no drugs are approved for acute treatment of PTL and recommended off-label tocolytic treatments (medications that inhibit labor) include beta-adrenergic receptor agonists, calcium channel blockers, or NSAIDs, which are used for short-term prolongation of pregnancy (up to 48 hours) to allow for the administration of antenatal steroids (e.g. betamethasone). Magnesium sulfate, used for fetal neuroprotection can also be used (up to 48 hours) to inhibit acute preterm labor. Approved tocolytic treatments in Europe include beta-adrenergic agonists, which carry severe maternal cardiovascular risks, and intravenous infusions of atosiban (an oxytocin receptor antagonist).

While prostaglandin inhibitors (NSAIDs) have been shown to be effective for inhibiting preterm labor, use of such drugs is limited, due to the threat of serious and sometimes life-threatening side effects in the fetus. Such side effects may include kidney function impairment, premature constriction of the blood vessel  connecting the pulmonary artery and the descending aorta in a developing fetus (ductus arteriosus), and higher risk of thrombosis of the intestinal arteries (a condition called necrotizing enterocolitis).

OBE022: An Advancement in the Treatment of Preterm Labor

ObsEva is currently advancing OBE022, a potential first-in-class, oral and selective prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2α) receptor antagonist, which is designed to control preterm labor by reducing inflammation, decreasing uterine contractions, preventing cervical changes and fetal membrane rupture without causing the potentially serious side effects to the fetus seen with non-specific prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors (NSAIDs). PGF2alpha is believed to induce contractions of the myometrium and also upregulate enzymes causing cervix dilation and membrane rupture. In nonclinical studies, ObsEva has observed that OBE022 markedly reduces spontaneous and induced uterine contractions in pregnant rats without causing the fetal side effects seen with prostaglandin inhibitors such as indomethacin.

OBE022

Oral PGF2α
receptor antagonist